2 Responses to ““Torn Memories of Nanking” – A Must Read”

  1. david chai says:

    Hi Don,
    Thanks for introducing me to Tamaki’s book. Now I want to finish it soon. I was not aware that the quote you mentioned at the very end from Prince Naruhito. Now with the intended resignation of his father, Prince Naruhito would hopefully be a more informed Emperor. After all, he is a History major as well as having spent 3 years of post-graduate school at Oxford College. He would have read many non-Japanese books and articles, especially English articles, on the atrocities of the Japanese military during WWII.
    Let’s hope for a better recognition, and hence hopefully accepting the responsibility for Japan’s past crimes against humanity.

    David

  2. Prof. James C. Hsiung says:

    As co-editor of the book China’s Bitter Victory: War with Japan, 1937-1945, I really think Tamaki Matsuoka’s book, Torn Memories of Nanking, should be a must-read, especially for the young Japanese. The reason is that against the background of the Japanese government’s consistent denial of the truth about the war, Ms. Matsuoka unearthed the evidence of what really happened when Japanese troops overran Nanking, then the national capital of China, and massacred 300,000 Chinese, including inoocent civilians, in December 1937. I might add that the size of the stunning 300,000 casualties was greater than the combined Japanese who were killed by the two atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
    Matsuoka speaks for the conscience of the Japanese nation and wins back the respect of many other Asians troubled by the Japanese government’s re-writing of history. Her courage and tenacity in finding out about the truth deserve the award of a Nobel prize.

Leave a Reply